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Author Topic: valve adj.  (Read 3347 times)
Charles S Otwell
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« on: August 01, 2006, 11:33:34 PM »

I don't have a 87 manual so can someone tell me how big a job is a valve adj? (Time wise) I know what Honda's shop time is but I don't find their time est. to be very customer friendly. I'm at 19,000 and I have no idea if it has ever been done. your thoughts and input  would be appreciated, thanks
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Charles
#279
Texarkana,Tx
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« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2006, 04:10:03 AM »

Charles, I personally think that unless the bike is running ill or power or fuel economy is down then I would not bother.
With that said, I have a manual at the house, when I get home later this morning I will give you the information.
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Greg Cothern
00 Valkyrie Interstate
96 Magna 
Previously owned:
87 Super
96 Magna project bike
95 Magna
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kdf9511
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« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2006, 06:23:42 AM »

Charles, here is the adj procedure according to Dave Dodge.  From what I have heard this is the way to do it.  I need to do this myself.


A) Remove all of the spark plugs and left side alternator cover.

 Rotate the engine at the crank nut (alternator) in a clockwise rotation (only) while putting your finger tightly over the #1 plug hole (left rear). When the engine begins compression stroke on #1 you will feel pressure against your finger. Once you begin to feel pressure, slowly rotate crank to align "T-1" index mark of the rotor with the case half alignment position. This is your starting point at cylinder #1

NOTE: The cam lobes on the rear cylinders Will point away from each other at TDC compression. The cam lobes on the front cylinders will point up and slightly towards each other when timing marks are aligned The marks on the cam sprockets will also line up with the gasket surface on the head when the cams are in the correct Inca f/on.

C) I personally do not use the factory Honda tool. I instead (beginning with #1, lobes pointing away from each other) insert a .003" feeler gauge between the cam lobe and rocker arm pad. I then turn the adjusting screws until they lightly touch the ends of the valves and tighten the lock nuts. This method will give you a snug .003" clearance at the cam, and .005" clearance at the valve. The recommended .004" at the valve is too tight.

D) Slowly rotate crank (clockwise from #1) with finger over #2 plug hole until 'T" rotor mark aligns with case mark. You should have felt the pressure against your finger. The lobes will be pointing up and slightly towards each other and the cam sprocket marks aligned with head surface. Adjust valves.

E) Slowly rotate crank to #3 cylinder and follow alignment procedure "C"

F) Slowly rotate crank to #4 cylinder and follow alignment procedure "D"

NOTE: After adjusting each cylinder check for proper clearance at each valve. After adjusting all of the valves, rotate engine for a couple revolutions and recheck all clearances again at TOO locations (just to make sure). When you are satisfied that all clearances are set, the locknuts must be torqued to 14 ft. lbs.
Because you are adjusting the valves at the location where the clearance would be the loosest, there is really no way to get them too tight.
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Kerry
Weatherford, OK

'84 VF700C Magna The MagnaWing
# 370
V4 Honda BBS
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« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2006, 08:13:43 AM »

87 VF700C Magna specific Honda Service manual lists different clearances and torque values.  The information from Dave Dodge is for the 1st generation.
The 87 needs .006" for intake and exhaust (cold).  Torque the tappet adjustment nuts down to 15-18 ft lbs.
Bring the intake cam lobe for the No. 3 cylinder to its maximum lift by rotating the crankshaft clockwise.
On that same camshaft, check the clearaneces for the No. 1 intake valve.
Rotate the crankshaft clockwise until the No.1 intake lobe is at its maximum lift and check/adjust the No.3 intake clearance.
Repeat this procedure for the No. 1 and No. 3 exhaust cam. then the No. 2 and No. 4 intake cam and finally the No. 2 and No. 4 exhaust cam.
Set the clearances using two feeler gauges, adjusting the screws until there is a slight drag on the feelers.
Hold the adjusting screw and tighten the lock nut.
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Greg Cothern
00 Valkyrie Interstate
96 Magna 
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Charles S Otwell
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« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2006, 08:30:19 AM »

Thanks guys for the info,The valve adj itself does'nt sound to bad. What I really need to know right now is how much time ,approx. Is this a half a day job or had I better plan on a couple of days. Honda indicated that a lot of parts has to be removed to get to the valves.
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Charles
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Texarkana,Tx
kdf9511
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« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2006, 09:47:41 AM »

I think Marc told me it took an hr or two on his V65.  I was going to do it at the last wrenching session at my house but decided if I was going to pull the rad that I wanted to replace the fanstat and thermostat and do a flush while it was off.  I just didn't feel like going into that much work at the time.
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Kerry
Weatherford, OK

'84 VF700C Magna The MagnaWing
# 370
V4 Honda BBS
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« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2006, 02:16:01 PM »

A couple hours and you take off the tank, tappet covers, plugs, to get to the tappet adjusters.  Might have to pull a bracket here or such to get a good no hassle approach.
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Greg Cothern
00 Valkyrie Interstate
96 Magna 
Previously owned:
87 Super
96 Magna project bike
95 Magna
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Charles S Otwell
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« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2006, 03:52:54 PM »

Thanks guys. I have a small shop but it's air conditioned this sounds like a good job for the middle of the day while it's so hot. The bike runs great but I have had a small ticking sound as long as I've had it thought maybe it was the valves. No one hear in North East Texas to listen and give me a second opinion.  Crying or Very sad anyway thanks again..
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Charles
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Texarkana,Tx
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« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2007, 05:47:51 PM »

I'm doing some research before attempting to check/adjust the valves on my 86 700 and I have come across several references to the "dual feeler gauge" method that Greg mentioned above.
Can someone elaborate further on the dual feeler method?
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« Reply #9 on: March 11, 2007, 08:14:54 AM »

Quote from: "arent_we_sarcastic"
I'm doing some research before attempting to check/adjust the valves on my 86 700 and I have come across several references to the "dual feeler gauge" method that Greg mentioned above.
Can someone elaborate further on the dual feeler method?

You use two feeler gauges to adjust the valves equally. It evenly spaces each side of the rocker arm which keeps even pressure on the cam lobe. I found that bending the feeler gauges about an inch from the end at a 45 and one end at a 90 degree angle you are able to get an accurate valve adjustment since the gauges won't be at an angle to increase the distance between the valve and rocker arm.
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Jeff
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« Reply #10 on: March 11, 2007, 04:41:36 PM »

Thanks Silverado.
The warmer weather is finally approaching so it's time to get the ride ready. Will let you know how it went.
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MagnaDaddy
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« Reply #11 on: March 11, 2007, 05:19:03 PM »

Is the Dave Dodge method only good for certain years?  Or better is there a BEST way to set them on my '86.
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Ken Strauss
Hutto, TX

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« Reply #12 on: March 25, 2007, 06:47:39 AM »

OK, I attempted the valve adjustment on my 86 VF 700 yesterday.

If you are reasonably handy, have all the tools, gaskets, drain pan  etc close at hand and don't run into any snags you should be able to easily complete the task in less than 4 hours.

It took me slightly longer than that because I did run into a couple of snags. One of the bolts on the left side cover was seizing when I was removing it . The second was that plastic cover above the rear tappet cover. It was on the cool side in the garage and I didn't want that cover to break as I was removing it so I directed a small space heater on it for a bit to warm it up and make it more flexible.

Some tips for other first timers...the bending of the feelers is the way to go (thanks to Silverado Cowboy for that tip!). If you don't have feelers already, get the type that have the screw type tensioner. That way, you can easily remove only the blades you need and it frees up some much needed hand space.

You might also want to wash your bike before you remove the front tappet cover. Especially the area behind the radiator. Otherwise you might inadvertently knock some assorted debris into the exposed engine.

The rear tappet cover is tricky to remove. It is in 2 pieces and comes out much easier if you separate them first. It's also a good idea to remove the coils first and the dreaded plastic cover if equipped.

Also, even though the radiator tap is in the "Closed" position it WILL occasionally leak drops of fluid in your face...especially when you are tired and are trying to set the clearances on the exhaust side of the #2 cylinder.

Seeing as how the coolant is mostly drained already you might as well flush the system and replace the coolant if it looks at all questionable...just be sure to have the proper type on hand.

It looks daunting at first but it's not that difficult. Just take your time and be patient.
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